Love, illness and historical memory in the moving Chilean documentary that aspires to the Oscar

The Pinochet dictatorship left a trail of terror since it began with the coup d'état against the Allende Government in 1973 and fell in 1990 after the plebiscite called two years earlier. The National Human Rights Institute of Chile estimates that at that time more than 38,000 people were tortured, of which 3,200 disappeared without a trace. 200,000 people left the country due to repressive policies, threats and fear. In those 17 years there was a turning point, what many described as the decisive year. It was 1986, when popular discontent broke out in the streets in the form of demonstrations and pot-banging. Activism that was responded to with more death and more repression.

They tried to put out those beginnings of rebellion with force, but also trying to hide them. Pinochet also dominated the media and established strict censorship so that nothing escaped his control. However, since 1984, when the protests began, three journalists joined together to create a news program in opposition to the regime. They were Fernando Paulsen, Dragomir Yankovic and Augusto Góngora; and the program, Teleanalysis , has subsequently been recognized by UNESCO as part of the Memory of the World Programme.

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