Pakistan passport ranks as fourth-worst in the world

A significant reshuffle has occurred in the assessment of the world’s most influential passports, with a record six nations now sharing the lead for the most coveted travel documents of 2024.
Citizens from France, Germany, Italy, Japan, Singapore, and Spain now have the privilege of visa-free or visa-on-arrival access to a remarkable 194 destinations worldwide – a peak since the Henley Passport Index started monitoring global travel freedoms 19 years ago.This index, developed by the London-based Henley & Partners and using exclusive data from the International Air Transport Association (IATA), reflects the latest trends in global mobility.
Historically, Japan and Singapore have held the top position for the last five years. However, the latest rankings mark a significant rise for European countries. Finland and Sweden, along with South Korea, are now in second place, offering access to 193 destinations. Austria, Denmark, Ireland, and the Netherlands are in a close third, each with access to 192 destinations.
Meanwhile, the index, which assesses global travel freedoms, highlights a significant disparity in global mobility, particularly focusing on the least powerful passports. Afghanistan remains at the lowest position on the index, with its citizens having visa-free access to only 28 countries. This stark contrast underscores the widening global mobility gap, as the top-ranked countries can now travel to 166 more destinations visa-free than Afghanistan.
Pakistan, with a visa-free score of 34, holds the dubious distinction of having the world’s fourth worst-powerful passport. Only, Iraq, Syria and Afghanistan are below it in the ranking of world’s most and least powerful passports.

10 least powerful passports 2024

  • Afghanistan (28)
  • Syria (29)
  • Iraq (31)
  • Pakistan (34)
  • Yemen (35)
  • Somalia (36)
  • Libya, Nepal, Palestinian Territories (40)
  • Bangladesh, North Korea (42)
  • Eritrea, Sri Lanka (43)
  • Iran, Lebanon, Nigeria, Sudan (45)

The report also sheds light on the broader implications of limited travel freedom. The gap in global mobility is not just a matter of convenience but also reflects deeper geopolitical and economic disparities. Countries with weaker passports often face challenges in international trade, investment, and the exchange of skills, which are crucial for economic progress.
The Henley Global Mobility Report 2024 emphasizes the importance of increasing travel freedom and openness to international collaboration as key drivers for global economic development. It suggests that enhancing visa-free access can have a positive impact on a country’s economic performance and global integration.
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